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Hacking

Webaganda*

   

get out and spread the word...

Billions of documents comprise the Web. Billions and billions. Chances are that any given search for information will turn up something. However, the odds of finding something useful depend heavily on those who use the Web. Adding to materials about topics of interest, maintaining existing documents, referencing appropriate resources, and publishing new material all bolster project visibility.

talk it up.

Suggest Crawl to someone who shows interest. Write a blog entry about the game; a brief mention is more than generous. Publish a review, a retrospective, or anything that comes to mind. When offered, take opportunities to rate Crawl. Revise Crawl's Wikipedia entry. Start a discussion on Usenet, an email list, or any appropriate online forum. Submit Crawl to a software index. On the Web, even the smallest of actions attracts notice from someone (or something) else. Just be honest.

review others' work.

As big and complex as it may be, the Web is nothing more than an elaborate beta-test. Technology and presentation issues aside, errors in substance, grammar, and reference weaken its appeal. [The foregoing applies equally to this site, too.] Each broken or outdated link, factual error, or labeling mistake hampers the exchange of information online.

Remember, given a large enough beta-tester and co-developer base, almost every problem will be characterized quickly and the fix obvious to someone. Could that someone be you? Take the time to offer a solution. Contact the local webmaster or editor. Be polite and to the point.

reference selectively.

Linking to every resource returned from a Web search proves a great temptation. [more...]

build it. they will come.

What better way to express apppreciation for Crawl than to launch a fansite? Think up something original and impart it through the Web. Involve others; ask for assistance when necessary. Promote your creation to like-minded Web communities. Be proactive. Link to related and referring sites. Build slowly and surely.

Don't abandon a site that fails or proves a challenge to manage. Stale content pollutes the Web space. Clearly state how to locate up-to-date information elsewhere. Invite volunteers to salvage stalled work. Transition documents of historical interest to accepting projects. Pull content that no longer receives attention or support.

 
 
revised 1 May 2017, 1:23 am EDT (builder)